Circumstances of Women's First Birth May Be Linked to Their Health During Middle Age

TitleCircumstances of Women's First Birth May Be Linked to Their Health During Middle Age
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsHollander, D
JournalPerspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Volume40
Issue1
Pagination57
Call Numbernewpubs20080528_Hollander
KeywordsAdult children, Demographics, Health Conditions and Status
Abstract

Once women reach late middle age, their mortality and disease risks may be related to their early childbearing history, according to analyses of data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which conducts periodic surveys to track participants' health, socioeconomic circumstances and family structure.1 Among U.S. women who were born in 1931-1941 and lived until at least the early 1990s, those who had first given birth as teenagers had elevated odds of dying between 1994 and 2002; they also were more likely than others to have had heart disease, lung disease or cancer by 1994. A series of logistic regression models controlling for background and midlife characteristics indicated that women who had given birth before age 20 were at increased risk of having had heart disease, lung disease or cancer by 1994 (coefficients, 0.3-0.4).

Endnote Keywords

womens health/Middle Age/CHILDREN/CANCER/Heart Diseases/Health Risk/Mortality

Endnote ID

18970

Citation Key7226