HRS Bibliography

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2017

Auerbach A, Charles KK, Coile C, et al. How the growing gap in life expectancy may affect retirement benefits and reforms. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice. 2017;42(3):475-499. doi:10.1057/s41288-017-0057-0.
Maurer R, Mitchell OS. Incentivizing older people to delay social security claiming. Frankfurt, Germany: SAFE; 2017.
Lin I-F, Brown SL, Hammersmith AM. Marital Biography, Social Security Receipt, and Poverty. Research on Aging. 2017;39(1):86-110. doi:10.1177/0164027516656139.
Borella M, De Nardi M, Yang F. Marriage-related Policies in an Estimated Life-cycle Model of Households' Labor Supply and Savings for Two Cohorts. Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Retirement Research Center; 2017:1-79.
Fitzpatrick M, Moore T. The Mortality Effects of Retirement: Evidence from Social Security Eligibility at Age 62. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2017. doi:10.3386/w24127.
Dushi I, Iams HM. Reporting accuracy of Social Security benefits and its implications in the Health and Retirement Study. Journal of Economic and Social Measurement. 2017;42(3-4):271-292. doi:10.3233/JEM-180449.
Khan MR, Rutledge MS, Sanzenbacher GT. Social Security and Total Replacement Rates in Disability and Retirement. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2017.
Andrews M. Social Security giveth, medical costs taketh away. Chicago Tribune.
Fawaz Y. To claim or to retire: The social security claiming decision of employed and unemployed workers. International Journal of Manpower. 2017;38(3):392-416. doi:10.1108/IJM-08-2015-0127.

2016

Gustman AL, Steinmeier TL, Tabatabai N. The Affordable Care Act as Retiree Health Insurance: Implications for Retirement and Social Security Claiming. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016:1-55. doi:10.3386/w22815.
Gustman AL, Steinmeier TL, Tabatabai N. Distributional Effects of Means Testing Social Security: An Exploratory Analysis. Cambridge, MA, National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016:1-28.
Hubener A, Maurer R, Mitchell OS. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios. Review of Financial Studies. 2016;29(4):937 - 978. doi:10.1093/rfs/hhv070.
Ameriks J, Briggs JS, Caplin A, Shapiro M, Tonetti C. Late-in-Life Risks and the Under-Insurance Puzzle. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016:1-62. doi:10.3386/w22726.
Bronshtein G, Scott J, Shoven J, Slavov S. Leaving Big Money on the Table: Arbitrage Opportunities in Delaying Social Security. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016:1-34. doi:10.3386/w22853.
Hurd MD, Rohwedder S. Living longer, working longer. Commentary (The RAND Blog).
Maurer R, Mitchell OS. Older Peoples’ Willingness to Delay Social Security Claiming. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016:1-27. doi:10.3386/w22942.
Mitchell OS. Public and Private Challenges of an Aging U.S. Population. Business Economics. 2016;51(1):8 - 10. doi:10.1057/be.2016.6.
Coile C, Milligan KS, Wise DA. Social Security and Retirement Programs Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages - Introduction and Summary. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2016.
Martin PP, Office of Retirement and Disability Policy. Why Researchers Now Rely on Surveys for Race Data on OASDI and SSI Programs: A Comparison of Four Major Surveys. Washington, DC, Social Security Administration; 2016.