HRS Bibliography

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Weir DR. Socio-economic Status and Mortality: Perceptions and Outcomes.; 2010.
Cutler DM, Meara E, Stewart S. Socioeconomic Status and the Experience of Pain: An Example from Knees. Cambridge, MA: The National Bureau of Economic Research; 2020. doi:10.3386/w27974.
Hill MJ, Maestas N, Mullen KJ. Source of health insurance coverage and employment survival among newly disabled workers: Evidence from the health and retirement study. Universitat Pompeu Fabra; 2014.
Bosworth B, Burtless GT, Zhang K. Sources of Increasing Differential Mortality Among the Aged by Socioeconomic Status. Boston College; 2015.
Perna M, Stempien J. Spending in retirement: How you just might find what you want and what you need. Atlanta: PGIM; 2020.
Wolfe B, Brazier R. Spending in retirement…or not?. New York City, NY: BlackRock; 2017.
Spending Patterns in Retirement: Retirees are Slow to Exhaust their Assets. Washington, DC: Employee Benefit Research Institute ; 2018:1-2.
Hurd MD, Rohwedder S. Spending Trajectories After Age 65. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation; 2022. doi:10.7249/RRA2355-1.
Hurd MD, Rohwedder S. Spending Trajectories After Age 65: Variation by Initial Wealth. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation; 2022. doi:10.7249/RRA2355-1.
McGeary KAnne. Spousal Effects in Smoking Cessation: Matching, Learning, or Bargaining?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2013. doi:10.3386/w19274.
SSA Permissions Consent History: 1992-2012 (Public Version). Ann Arbor: Survey Research Center, University of Michigan; 2015:5.PDF icon Download PDF (62.86 KB)
Ekerdt DJ, DeViney S, Kosloski K. Stability and Change in Plans for Retirement. University of Michigan; 1996.
Chen Y, Fang H. The State of Mental Health Among the Elderly Chinese. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2020. doi:10.3386/w26690.
Coe NB, Khan MR, Rutledge MS. Sticky Ages: Why is Age 65 Still a Retirement Peak?. Boston, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2013.
Bond T, Saad-Lessler J, Weller C. Still shortchanged: An update on women's retirement preparedness. Washington, D.C.: National Institute on Retirement Security ; 2020.
House CL, Mocanu AMaria, Shapiro MD. Stimulus Effects of Investment Tax Incentives: Production versus Purchases. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2017. doi:10.3386/w23391.
Kezdi G, Willis RJ. Stock Market Expectations and Portfolio Choice of American Households. University of Michigan; 2009.
Munnell AH, Golub-Sass A, Karamcheva NS. Strange But True: Claim and Suspend Social Security. Boston: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2009.
Munnell AH, Golub-Sass A, Karamcheva NS. Strange But True: Claim Social Security Now, Claim More Later. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2009.
Munnell AH, Golub-Sass A, Karamcheva NS. Strange But True: Free Loan from Social Security. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2009.
Ippolito RA. A Study of Health Human Capital. George Mason University School of Law; 2003.
Honig M. The Subjective Probabilities of Retirement of White, Black, and Hispanic Married Women. University of Michigan; 1993.
Elder TE. Subjective Survival Probabilities in the Health and Retirement Study: Systematic Biases and Predictive Validity. Ann Arbor, MI: Michigan Retirement Research Center, University of Michigan; 2007. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1083823.
Manski CF. Survey Measurement of Probabilistic Macroeconomic Expectations: Progress and Promise. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research; 2017. doi:10.3386/w23418.
Kuo H-HDaphne, Park H, Hauser TS, Hauser RM, Marks NF. Surveys of the Life Course and Aging: Some Comparisons. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin-Madison; 2001.