HRS Bibliography

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Wolfe B, Brazier R. Spending in retirement…or not?. New York City, NY: BlackRock; 2017.
Perna M, Stempien J. Spending in retirement: How you just might find what you want and what you need. Atlanta: PGIM; 2020.
Bosworth B, Burtless GT, Zhang K. Sources of Increasing Differential Mortality Among the Aged by Socioeconomic Status. Boston College; 2015.
Hill MJ, Maestas N, Mullen KJ. Source of health insurance coverage and employment survival among newly disabled workers: Evidence from the health and retirement study. Universitat Pompeu Fabra; 2014.
Cutler DM, Meara E, Stewart S. Socioeconomic Status and the Experience of Pain: An Example from Knees. Cambridge, MA: The National Bureau of Economic Research; 2020. doi:10.3386/w27974.
Weir DR. Socio-economic Status and Mortality: Perceptions and Outcomes.; 2010.
Baird MD, Zaber MA, Chen A, et al. Societal Impact of Research Funding for Women's Health in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation; 2022.
Baird MD, Zaber MA, Dick AW, et al. Societal Impact of Research Funding for Women's Health in Alzheimer's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease - Related Dementias. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation; 2021. doi:10.7249/RR-A708-1.
Gustman AL, Steinmeier TL, Tabatabai N. The Social Security Windfall Elimination and Government Pension Offset Provisions for Public Employees in the Health and Retirement Study. Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan; 2013.
Sabelhaus J, Volz AHenriques. Social Security Wealth, Inequality, and Life-cycle Saving: An Update. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Retirement and Disability Research Center; 2020.
Phillips JWR, Mitchell OS. Social Security Replacement Rates for Alternative Earnings Benchmarks. Philadelphia, PA: The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; 2006.
Jones JBailey, Li Y. Social Security Reform with Heterogeneous Mortality. Richmond, VA: Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond; 2020.
United States Governmental Office. Social Security Reform: Raising the Retirement Ages Would Have Implications for Older Workers and SSA Disability Rolls. Washington, DC, U.S. Government Accountability Office; 2010.
United States General Accounting Office. Social Security Reform: Raising Retirement Ages Improves Program Solvency but May Cause Hardship for Some. U.S. General Accounting Office; 1998.
United States General Accounting Office. Social Security Reform: Implications of Raising the Retirement Age. Washington, DC, U.S. General Accounting Office; 1999.
Cackley APuente. Social Security Reform: Implications for Women's Retirement Income. Washington, DC, United States General Accounting Office; 1997.
United States General Accounting Office. Social Security Reform: Implications for Women s Retirement Income. Washington, DC, U.S. General Accounting Office; 1997.
Brown M. Social Security Reform and the Exchange of Bequests for Elder Care. Boston: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2003.
Coile C, Milligan K, Wise DA. Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Disability Insurance Programs and Retirement - Introduction and Summary. NBER; 2014. doi:10.3386/w20120.
van der Klaauw W, Wolpin KI. Social Security, Pensions and the Savings and Retirement Behavior of Households. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2002.
Hou W, Sanzenbacher GT. Social Security Is a Great Equalizer. Center for Retirement Research; 2020.
Dominitz J, Manski CF, Heinz J. Social Security Expectations and Retirement Savings Decisions. Cambridge, MA: The National Bureau of Economic Research; 2001. doi:https://www.nber.org/papers/w8718.
Bound J, Waidmann TA, Michigan Retirement Research Center. The Social Security Early Retirement Benefit as Safety Net. The University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center; 2010.
Chen A, Liu S, Munnell AH. Social Security Claiming: COVID-19 vs. Great Recession. Newton, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2022.
Munnell AH, Chen A, Liu S. Social Security Claiming: COVID-19 vs. Great Recession. Chestnut Hill, MA: Center for Retirement Research at Boston College; 2022.