Racial Disparities in Stroke Recovery Persistence in the Post-Acute Stroke Recovery Phase: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study

TitleRacial Disparities in Stroke Recovery Persistence in the Post-Acute Stroke Recovery Phase: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsBuie, J, Zhao, Y, Burns, S, Magwood, G, Adams, R, Sims, C, Lackland, D
JournalEthnicity & Disease
Volume30
Issue2
Pagination339-348
Type of ArticleJournal
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Blacks, Epidemiology, Motor Skills, Risk Factors
Abstract

Background and Purpose: Blacks have a higher burden of post-stroke disability. Factors associated with racial differences in long-term post-stroke disability are not well-understood. Our aim was to assess the long-term racial differences in risk factors associated with stroke recovery.Methods: We examined Health and Retire­ment Study (HRS) longitudinal interview data collected from adults living with stroke who were aged >50 years during 2000- 2014. Analysis of 1,002 first-time, non- Hispanic, Black (210) or White (792) stroke survivors with data on activities of daily liv­ing (ADL), fine motor skills (FMS) and gross motor skills (GMS) was conducted. Ordinal regression analysis was used to assess the impact of sex, race, household residents, household income, comorbidities, and the time since having a stroke on functional outcomes.Results: Black stroke survivors were young­er compared with Whites (69 ± 10.4 vs 75 ± 11.9). The majority (~65%) of Black stroke survivors were female compared with about 54% White female stroke survivors (P=.007). Black stroke survivors had more household residents (P<.001) and comor­bidities (P<.001). Aging, being female, being Black and a longer time since stroke were associated with a higher odds of hav­ing increased difficulty in ADL, FMS and/or GMS. Comorbidities were associated with increased difficulty with GMS. Black race increased the impact of comorbidities on ADL and FMS in comparison with Whites.Conclusion: Our data suggest that the effects of aging, sex and unique factors associated with race should be taken into consideration for future studies of post-stroke recovery and therapy.

URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32346280
DOI10.18865/ed.30.2.339
Citation Key10704
PubMed ID32346280
PubMed Central IDPMC7186057