Association Between Lifetime History of Traumatic Brain Injury, Prescription Opioid Use and Persistent Pain: A Nationally Representative Study.

TitleAssociation Between Lifetime History of Traumatic Brain Injury, Prescription Opioid Use and Persistent Pain: A Nationally Representative Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsKumar, RG, Ornstein, KA, Corrigan, J, Adams, RSayko, Dams-O'Connor, K
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
ISSN Number1557-9042
KeywordsBrain Injuries, Epidemiology
Abstract

Pain is common among adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI), yet little data exists regarding prevalence of opioid use in this population. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the association between lifetime TBI exposure, opioid use, and pain in a nationally-representative sample of 1,022 adults aged 50+ who participated in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Our primary exposure was lifetime TBI history measured via the Ohio State University TBI Identification Method. We evaluated three alternate TBI exposures (years since most recent TBI, age at first TBI, and number of lifetime TBIs) in sensitivity analyses. We evaluated two outcomes: recent opioid medication use, and moderate-to-severe pain measured over two HRS waves. We classified three pain groups (persistent, intermittent, and no pain). Prevalence of opioid use among individuals with and without TBI were 19.7% and 13.6%, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and race, individuals with TBI had a 52% increased risk for opioid use compared to individuals without TBI (RR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.11, 2.04). Individuals with recent TBI (1-10 years ago), first TBI after age 40+, and 2+ lifetime TBIs had greatest risk for opioid use. Compared to individuals without TBI, individuals with TBI had 4.9-times increased odds for persistent versus no pain, and 1.9-times increased odds of intermittent versus no pain. Persistent pain among adults with lifetime TBI is elevated compared to the general population, which may contribute to increased opioid use among persons with TBI, particularly those with recent injuries or multiple lifetime TBIs.

DOI10.1089/neu.2020.7496
Citation Key11430
PubMed ID33567980