Progression to diabetes by baseline glycemic status among middle-aged and older adults in the United States, 2006-2014.

TitleProgression to diabetes by baseline glycemic status among middle-aged and older adults in the United States, 2006-2014.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsBardenheier, BH, Wu, W-C, Zullo, AR, Gravenstein, S, Gregg, EW
JournalDiabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Volume174
ISSN Number1872-8227
KeywordsDiabetes, Glycemic Index
Abstract

AIMS: Primary prevention studies have indicated that structured lifestyle change programs in adults with an annual diabetes risk of 4.7% are cost-effective. However, few population-based studies have quantified the risk of diabetes among adults with prediabetes.

METHODS: We used the nationally representative U.S. Health and Retirement Study to identify adults aged ≥ 52 years with prediabetes (A1c: 5.7% - 6.4%) in 2006 and followed them to 2014 to assess diabetes status defined by A1c ≥ 6.5% in 2010 or 2014 or by self-report of a diabetes diagnosis by various risk factors.

RESULTS: Among the 1,406 adults with prediabetes (average 4.7 years of follow-up), risk factors significantly associated with subsequent incident diabetes with adjusted annual risk of diabetes ≥ 4.7% were: male gender (4.8%); aged 52-64 years (5.0%); Black race (5.5%); obesity (body mass index (kg/m) ≥ 30.0, 6.8%); large waist circumference (women: > 35 inches; men: > 40 inches, 4.9%); C-reactive protein levels ≥3 ug/L (5.5%); treated for high cholesterol (4.7%); treated for hypertension (5.3%); and moderate mobility loss (4.8%).

CONCLUSIONS: Primary prevention interventions among adults with prediabetes who also have moderate mobility loss or well-known risk factors for diabetes are likely to be cost-effective.

DOI10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108726
Citation Key11477
PubMed ID33662490