The Association between Subjective Age and Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome: Results from a Population-Based Cohort Study.

TitleThe Association between Subjective Age and Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome: Results from a Population-Based Cohort Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsStephan, Y, Sutin, AR, Canada, B, Terracciano, A
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology: Series B
ISSN Number1758-5368
KeywordsBMI, cognitive complaint, motoric cognitive risk, Subjective age, walking speed
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, characterized by cognitive complaints and slower gait speed, is a pre-dementia syndrome associated with dementia and mortality risk. The present study examined whether subjective age, that is how old or young individuals feel relative to their chronological age, is related to concurrent and incident MCR syndrome. A relation between subjective age and MCR will inform knowledge on psychological factors related to dementia risk, identify who is at greater risk, and suggest a potential target of intervention.

METHOD: The study sample was composed of 6,341 individuals aged 65 to 107 years without dementia from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal study of adults aged 50 years and older. Participants completed measures of subjective age, cognitive complaints, and gait speed and provided information on demographic factors, cognition, physical activity, depressive symptoms, and body mass index (BMI) at baseline in 2008/2010. Incident MCR was assessed four and eight years later.

RESULTS: Controlling for demographic factors, an older subjective age was related to more than 60% higher likelihood of MCR at baseline and to around 50% higher risk of incident MCR over time. These associations remained significant when cognition, physical inactivity, depressive symptoms, and BMI were included in the analytic models.

CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that how old individuals feel is related to concurrent and incident MCR beyond the effect of chronological age, other demographic factors, physical inactivity, depressive symptoms, BMI, and cognitive functioning.

DOI10.1093/geronb/gbab047
Citation Key11513
PubMed ID33718965