Multifaceted Demands of Work and Their Associations with Cognitive Functioning: Findings From the Health and Retirement Study.

TitleMultifaceted Demands of Work and Their Associations with Cognitive Functioning: Findings From the Health and Retirement Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsLee, YJane, Gonzales, E, Andel, R
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology: Series B
ISSN Number1758-5368
KeywordsCognition, Employment, Older workers
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The present study examines the associations among mental, social, and physical demands of work with cognitive functioning among older adults in the United States.

METHODS: Data from 3,176 respondents in the Health and Retirement Study were analyzed using growth curve modeling (2004-2014). The study investigated differences by gender, race, ethnicity, and education.

RESULTS: Higher mental and social demands of work were associated with higher levels of initial cognitive functioning, but not significantly associated with slower cognitive decline over time. Physical demands of work were negatively associated with initial cognitive functioning and also marginally associated with a slower rate of decline in cognitive functioning going into older adulthood. In stratified analyses, results varied by sociodemographic characteristics.

DISCUSSION: The results partially support the environmental complexity hypothesis and the productive aging framework in that higher mental and social demands and lower physical demands relate to better cognitive functioning at baseline, with the differences appearing stable throughout older adulthood. The stratified results shed light on addressing disparities in cognitive aging and work environments.

DOI10.1093/geronb/gbab087
Citation Key11626
PubMed ID33979436