The Association between Multiple Chronic Conditions and Depressive Symptoms: Intersectional Distinctions by Race, Nativity, and Gender.

TitleThe Association between Multiple Chronic Conditions and Depressive Symptoms: Intersectional Distinctions by Race, Nativity, and Gender.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsErving, CL, Frazier, C
JournalJournal of Health and Social Behavior
ISSN Number2150-6000
Keywordscumulative disadvantage, depression, Intersectionality, Multiple Chronic Conditions
Abstract

Using random coefficient growth curve analysis, this study utilizes 12 waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study (1994-2016; person-waves = 145,177) to examine the association between multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and depressive symptoms among older adults. Applying cumulative disadvantage and intersectionality theories, we also test whether the association between MCC and depressive symptoms differs by race, nativity, and gender. Findings reveal that MCC prevalence is highest among U.S.-born black women, whereas depressive symptoms are highest among foreign-born Hispanic women. Compared to men, MCC has a stronger effect on women's depressive symptoms. Furthermore, the MCC-depressive symptoms association is strongest for foreign-born Hispanic women. Despite an increase in MCC in the transition from midlife to late life, all race-nativity-gender groups experience a decline in depressive symptoms as they age. The decline in depressive symptoms is steepest for U.S.-born black and foreign-born Hispanic women. Study implications are discussed.

DOI10.1177/00221465211040174
Citation Key11895
PubMed ID34590498