History of drinking problems diminishes the protective effects of within-guideline drinking on 18-year risk of dementia and CIND.

TitleHistory of drinking problems diminishes the protective effects of within-guideline drinking on 18-year risk of dementia and CIND.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsBrennan, PL, Holahan, CJ, Moos, RH, Schutte, KK
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume21
Issue1
Pagination2319
ISSN Number1471-2458
KeywordsAlcohol Consumption, CIND, Dementia, Drinking problems
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the moderating effect of older adults' history of drinking problems on the relationship between their baseline alcohol consumption and risk of dementia and cognitive impairment, no dementia (CIND) 18 years later.

METHOD: A longitudinal Health and Retirement Study cohort (n = 4421) was analyzed to demonstrate how older adults' baseline membership in one of six drinking categories (non-drinker, within-guideline drinker, and outside-guideline drinker groups, divided to reflect absence or presence of a history of drinking problems) predicts dementia and CIND 18 years later.

RESULTS: Among participants with no history of drinking problems, 13% of non-drinkers, 5% of within-guideline drinkers, and 9% of outside-guideline drinkers were classified as having dementia 18-years later. Among those with a history of drinking problems, 14% of non-drinkers, 9% of within-guideline drinkers, and 7% of outside-guideline drinkers were classified with dementia. With Non-Drinker, No HDP as reference category, being a baseline within-guideline drinker with no history of drinking problems reduced the likelihood of dementia 18 years later by 45%, independent of baseline demographic and health characteristics; being a baseline within-guideline drinker with a history of drinking problems reduced the likelihood by only 13% (n.s.). Similar patterns obtained for the prediction of CIND.

CONCLUSIONS: For older adults, consuming alcohol at levels within validated guidelines for low-risk drinking may offer moderate long-term protection from dementia and CIND, but this effect is diminished by having a history of drinking problems. Efforts to predict and prevent dementia and CIND should focus on older adults' history of drinking problems in addition to how much alcohol they consume.

DOI10.1186/s12889-021-12358-4
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34949174?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
Citation Key12075
PubMed ID34949174