A diagnosis of diabetes and health behavior maintenance in middle-aged and older adults in the United States: The role of self-efficacy and social support.

TitleA diagnosis of diabetes and health behavior maintenance in middle-aged and older adults in the United States: The role of self-efficacy and social support.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsQin, W
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume155
Pagination106958
ISSN Number1096-0260
KeywordsDiabetes diagnosis, Health behavior maintenance, Self-efficacy, Social Support
Abstract

The present study aims to investigate the relationship between a diagnosis of diabetes and the maintenance of health behaviors, and whether self-efficacy and social support moderate the relationship. The study sample came from the 2006 to 2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study in the United States (N = 13,143). A diagnosis of diabetes was ascertained by self-reported physician-diagnosed condition. Self-efficacy was measured using a 5-item scale. Social support from family and friends were measured separately by a 3-item scale. Three health behaviors were examined, namely alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to test the study aims. Respondents who reported a diagnosis of diabetes were 1.50 times more likely to fail to maintain physical activity (95% CI = 1.26, 1.77). This relationship was moderated by social support from family, which was related to lower hazards of failure to maintain physical activity among individuals who had a diagnosis of diabetes compared to those without a diagnosis. The study suggests that a diagnosis of diabetes may be a stressful health event that negatively affects physical activity maintenance. In addition, the findings highlight the importance of incorporating strategies to mobilize social support from family, which may help individuals sustain their efforts to maintaining health-promoting behaviors after a diabetes diagnosis.

DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2022.106958
Citation Key12207
PubMed ID35065973
Grant ListT32 AG000221 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States