Time-varying exposure analysis of the relationship between sustained natural dentition and cognitive decline.

TitleTime-varying exposure analysis of the relationship between sustained natural dentition and cognitive decline.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2023
AuthorsMatsuyama, Y
JournalJ Clin Periodontol
Volume50
Issue6
Pagination727-735
Date Published2023 Jun
ISSN Number1600-051X
KeywordsAdult, Cognitive Dysfunction, Dentition, Humans, Mouth, Edentulous, Tooth Loss
Abstract

AIM: Tooth loss and cognitive decline progress over time and influence each other. This study estimated the impact of sustaining natural dentition on cognitive function in U.S. adults, accounting for the fact that dental and cognitive statuses change over time.

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p>MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from adults aged ≥51 years who participated in five waves of the Health and Retirement Study from 2004 to 2016 (n = 10,953) were analysed. The impact of retaining some natural teeth from 2006 to 2012 on cognitive function score (0-27) and cognitive impairment (defined as having a cognitive function score of <12) in 2016 was evaluated using the doubly robust targeted maximum likelihood estimation method by considering both time-invariant and time-varying confounders, including cognitive function at baseline and during follow-up.

RESULTS: Respondents with some natural teeth between 2006 and 2012 had a 0.40 point (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.10-0.71) higher cognitive function score and 3.27 percentage point (95% CI: 0.11-6.66) lower cognitive impairment prevalence in 2016 than those with complete tooth loss.

CONCLUSIONS: Considering past cognitive function assessed at multiple time points, sustained natural dentition was associated with better cognitive function.

DOI10.1111/jcpe.13786
Citation Key13129
PubMed ID36734069