Subjective Memory Complaints Predict Decline in Memory, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, and Social Participation in Older Adults: A Fixed-Effects Model.

TitleSubjective Memory Complaints Predict Decline in Memory, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, and Social Participation in Older Adults: A Fixed-Effects Model.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2023
AuthorsLee, CDae, Foster, ER
JournalAm J Occup Ther
Volume77
Issue4
ISSN Number0272-9490
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Aging, Female, Humans, Independent Living, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Memory Disorders, Social participation
Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Although subjective memory complaints (SMCs) have been suggested to be associated with future memory impairment, limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and social participation restriction, these associations are still inconclusive.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether changes in SMCs over time predict decline in memory, IADLs, and social participation in older adults.

DESIGN: Longitudinal study.

SETTING: Community.

PARTICIPANTS: Sample 1 included 2,493 community-dwelling older adults drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data collected between 2004 and 2018. Sample 2 included 1,644 community-dwelling older adults drawn from the HRS data collected between 2008 and 2018.

OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Self-reported SMCs, memory function, self-reported IADL performance, and self-reported social participation.

RESULTS: The mean age of Sample 1 at baseline was 70.16 yr; 1,468 (58.88%) were female. In Sample 1, immediate and delayed memory (all ps < .001) and IADL performance (p < .01) declined over time. Increases in SMCs over time significantly predicted future immediate and delayed memory declines (p < .01 and p < .001, respectively) and future IADL performance decline (p < .001), after controlling for depressive symptoms. The mean age of Sample 2 at baseline was 71.52 yr; 928 (56.45%) were female. In Sample 2, social participation declined over time (all ps < .001). Increases in SMCs over time significantly predicted future social participation decline (p < .05), after controlling for depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Increases in SMCs predict future decline in memory, IADL performance, and social participation after accounting for depressive symptoms. What This Article Adds: SMCs can be used as an early indicator of future memory impairment, IADL limitations, and social participation restrictions in older adults. Furthermore, interventions that minimize SMCs may help older adults achieve successful aging.

DOI10.5014/ajot.2023.050151
Citation Key13499
PubMed ID37606938