Prevalence and incidence of mild cognitive impairment in adults with diabetes in the United States.

TitlePrevalence and incidence of mild cognitive impairment in adults with diabetes in the United States.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsZheng, Y, Ma, Q, Qi, X, Zhu, Z, Wu, B
JournalDiabetes research and clinical practice
Volume205
Pagination110976
ISSN Number1872-8227
KeywordsClinical, cognition impairment, Complications of diabetes, Epidemiology, prevalence estimation, type 2 diabetes mellitus
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited evidence exists about the prevalence and incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in individuals with diabetes in the U.S. We aimed to address such knowledge gaps using a nationally representative study dataset.

METHOD: We conducted a secondary analysis from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (1996-2018). The sample for examining the prevalence of MCI was14,988, with 4192 (28.0%) having diabetes, while the sample for the incidence was 21,824, with 1534 (28.0%) having diabetes.

RESULTS: Participants with diabetes had a higher prevalence of MCI than those without diabetes (19.9 % vs. 14.8 %; odds ratio [95 % confidence interval] (OR[95 %CI]): 1.468 [1.337, 1.611], p <.001). The incidence of MCI in participants with/without newly diagnosed diabetes was 42.9 % vs. 31.6 % after a mean 10-year follow-up, with the incidence rate ratio (IRR) [95 %CI] (1.314 [1.213, 1.424], p <.001). Newly diagnosed diabetes was associated with elevated risks of MCI compared with non-diabetes, with the uncontrolled hazard ratio (HR) [95 %CI] (1.498 [1.405, 1.597], p <.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Using a nationally representative study data in the U.S., participants with diabetes had a higher prevalence and incidence of MCI than those without diabetes. Findings show the importance of developing interventions tailored to the needs of individuals with diabetes and cognitive impairment.

DOI10.1016/j.diabres.2023.110976
Citation Key13605
PubMed ID37890703