Measures of Aging Biology in Saliva and Blood as Novel Biomarkers for Stroke and Heart Disease in Older Adults.

TitleMeasures of Aging Biology in Saliva and Blood as Novel Biomarkers for Stroke and Heart Disease in Older Adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2023
AuthorsWaziry, R, Gu, Y, Boehme, AK, Williams, OA
JournalNeurology
Volume101
Issue23
Paginatione2355-e2363
ISSN Number1526-632X
KeywordsAged, Aging, Biology, Biomarkers, DNA Methylation, Heart Diseases, Humans, Middle Aged, Saliva, Stroke, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The role of aging biology as a novel risk factor and biomarker for vascular outcomes in different accessible body tissues such as saliva and blood remain unclear. We aimed to (1) assess the role of aging biology as a risk factor of stroke and heart disease among individuals of same chronologic age and sex and (2) compare aging biology biomarkers measured in different accessible body tissues as novel biomarkers for stroke and heart disease in older adults.

METHODS: This study included individuals who consented for blood and saliva draw in the Venous Blood Substudy and Telomere Length Study of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The HRS is a population-based, nationally representative longitudinal survey of individuals aged 50 years and older in the United States. Saliva-based measures included telomere length. Blood-based measures included DNA methylation and physiology biomarkers. Propensity scores-matched analyses and Cox regression models were conducted.

RESULTS: This study included individuals aged 50 years and older, who consented for blood (N = 9,934) and saliva (N = 5,808) draw in the HRS. Blood-based biomarkers of aging biology showed strong associations with incident stroke as follows: compared with the lowest tertile of blood-based biomarkers of aging, biologically older individuals had significantly higher risk of stroke based on DNA methylation Grim Age clock (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 2.64, 95% CI 1.90-3.66, < 0.001) and Physiology-based Phenotypic Age clock (aHR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.27-2.42, < 0.001). In secondary analysis, biologically older individuals had increased risk of heart disease as follows: DNA methylation Grim Age clock (aHR = 1.77, 95% CI 1.49-2.11, < 0.001) and Physiology-based Phenotypic Age clock (aHR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.36-1.90, < 0.001).

DISCUSSION: Compared with saliva-based telomere length, blood-based aging physiology and some DNA methylation biomarkers are strongly associated with vascular disorders including stroke and are more precise and sensitive biomarkers of aging. Saliva-based telomere length and blood-based DNA methylation and physiology biomarkers likely represent different aspects of biological aging and accordingly vary in their precision as novel biomarkers for optimal vascular health.

DOI10.1212/WNL.0000000000207909
Citation Key13692
PubMed ID37848333
PubMed Central IDPMC10752636
Grant ListK99 AG075196 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States