Perceived discrimination and nativity status: risk of cognitive impairment among Latin American older adults.

TitlePerceived discrimination and nativity status: risk of cognitive impairment among Latin American older adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsTibiriçá, L, Jester, DJ, Kohn, JN, Williams, AP, McEvoy, LK, Palmer, BW
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Pagination1-13
ISSN Number1741-203X
KeywordsCognition, Discrimination, Latinx, nativity status
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between perceived discrimination and the risk of cognitive impairment with no dementia (CIND) and Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) while considering the potential effects of nativity status.

DESIGN: A prospective analysis of discrimination and nativity status with dementia and cognitive impairment was conducted among Latinx adults aged 51 years and older who participated in the Health and Retirement Study.

SETTING: A national representative sample.

PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 1,175 Latinx adults aged 51 years and older.

MEASUREMENTS: Demographics, cognitive functioning, perceived discrimination, and nativity status (US-born vs. non-US born) were assessed. Traditional survival analysis methods (Fine and gray models) were used to account for the semi-competing risk of death with up to 10 years of follow-up.

RESULTS: According to our results, neither everyday discrimination nor nativity status on their own had a statistically significant association with CIND/ADRD; however, non-US-born Latinx adults who reported no discrimination had a 42% lower risk of CIND/ADRD (SHR = 0.58 [0.41, 0.83], = .003) than US-born adults.

CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the need for healthcare providers to assess for discrimination and provide support and resources for those experiencing discrimination. It also highlights the need for better policies that address discrimination and reduce health disparities.

DOI10.1017/S1041610223004374
Citation Key13694
PubMed ID38037791