Religious Involvement and the Impact on Living Alone and Depression: An Examination of Gendered Pathways Post-Widowhood.

TitleReligious Involvement and the Impact on Living Alone and Depression: An Examination of Gendered Pathways Post-Widowhood.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsHawes, FM, Tavares, JL
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Pagination7334648231225355
ISSN Number1552-4523
Keywordsdepression, gender, Religion, Social Support, Widows
Abstract

This study analyzed data from the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to examine the association between widowhood and depression. The results revealed that both men and women experienced increased depression after widowhood, with women exhibiting a better recovery pattern over time. Religiosity, especially attending religious services, was found to be a beneficial coping mechanism for both genders, although men were less religious than women. Living alone was a significant factor associated with depression in widowhood for both men and women. High religious service attendance moderated the association between living alone and depression for women, while both high and moderate religious service attendance moderated this association for men. These findings emphasize the importance of considering gender differences and the potential benefits of religious involvement in addressing depression during widowhood, highlighting the need for tailored interventions and support services for widows and widowers, particularly those living alone.

DOI10.1177/07334648231225355
Citation Key13714
PubMed ID38174723