Using the Self-Regulation Model to Understand Factors Influencing Medication Adherence Among Older Adults Living with Hypertension in the United States Utilizing the Health and Retirement Study Data

TitleUsing the Self-Regulation Model to Understand Factors Influencing Medication Adherence Among Older Adults Living with Hypertension in the United States Utilizing the Health and Retirement Study Data
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsRuksakulpiwat, S
Academic DepartmentNursing
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
Number of Pages181
UniversityCase Western Reserve University
CityCleveland, Ohio
Keywordsdemographic aspect, hyperextension, Medication, Older Adults, Psychological
Abstract

The study investigates the multifaceted landscape of medication adherence and its intricate ties to health outcomes among older adults living with hypertension in the United States. Employing the Self-Regulation Model (SRM) as a guiding framework, this research delves into the interplay between psychological, demographic, and health-related factors, shedding light on their collective influence on adherence behavior and its consequential impact on blood pressure control, stroke risk, and activities of daily living (ADL). The research reveals significant correlations between psychological perceptions and medication adherence, aligning with the SRM's emphasis on beliefs and attitudes as key determinants of health-related behaviors. Older adults exhibiting positive perceptions of hypertension demonstrated heightened medication adherence, suggesting that viewing hypertension positively fosters a greater commitment to medication regimens as a fundamental self-management strategy. Furthermore, the study uncovers a substantial link between depression and medication non-adherence, underscoring the significance of addressing mental health concerns to improve adherence rates. The impact of medication adherence on health outcomes becomes evident in its correlation with blood pressure control and ADL performance. Adherence to antihypertensive medication emerges as a key determinant of systolic blood pressure levels, emphasizing the pivotal role of consistent adherence in optimizing cardiovascular health. Additionally, medication adherence is linked to enhanced ADL performance, showcasing its broader influence on functional independence and overall well-being. Notably, the study unveils an intriguing aspect of medication tolerability, revealing its potential influence on stroke incidence. Older adults reporting minimal medication side effects demonstrated a lower likelihood of stroke, illustrating the importance of medication tolerability in sustaining adherence and subsequently reducing stroke risk. By examining the mediating role of medication adherence, this research demonstrates how psychological factors like emotional and psychiatric problems influence health outcomes. The study reveals that depression's impact on ADL impairment is partially mediated by medication adherence, highlighting the role of adherence in translating psychological well-being into functional outcomes. The findings contribute to a holistic understanding of the diverse factors shaping adherence behavior and offer insights for tailored interventions aimed at optimizing medication adherence, addressing mental health concerns, and enhancing overall well-being in this vulnerable population.

URLhttp://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=case1701952672637902
Citation Key13731