Word is Bond! Exploration Into Organizational Culture and Community Cultural Wealth Values, Observations of Financial Literacy and Economic Equity of Blacks

TitleWord is Bond! Exploration Into Organizational Culture and Community Cultural Wealth Values, Observations of Financial Literacy and Economic Equity of Blacks
Publication TypeThesis
Year of Publication2023
AuthorsL. Turner-Washington, S
Academic DepartmentEducation
DegreeDoctor in Education in Career and Technical Education Degree
UniversityUniversity of Wisconsin-Stout
CityMenomonie, WI
KeywordsBlack English, Black workers, capitalism, community cultural wealth, cultural capital, economic equity, entrepreneur, Financial literacy, organizational culture, slavery/enslavement, spiritual capital, training and development, worker management, Workforce
Abstract

Community cultural wealth has value in the workforce. The individual’s cultural capital and financial literacy values are not a separate experience to the organization culture. The dominant culture within the organization has a role of understanding and accepting the whole of Black American workers. This study will explore organizational culture and community cultural wealth values through observations of the financial literacy and economic equity of Blacks. The study includes findings from eight generations of Black workers and entrepreneurs from three data sets and interviews. Few studies examine how Community Cultural Wealth (CCW) factors into the survival and empowerment of cultural capital values throughout the lifespan of Blacks in the workforce. It is not enough to know that Blacks acquire less wealth—inquiries into financial literacy, illiteracy, and decisions made in an organizational culture context are insightful. A key component could be how Blacks view themselves in their communities, Blackness in the workforce, or are they viewed as breathing bitcoins. The study discussed conclusions such as workforce oppression that is not to be labeled as workplace conflict, diversity initiatives are not cultural capital assessments, Black English, and a seventh form of cultural capital drawn from the research and introduced recommendations for workforce training development stakeholders, academia, and policymakers. The study can be replicated by institutions or organizations with an interest in expanding cultural values and economic equity models.

URLhttps://minds.wisconsin.edu/handle/1793/84878
Citation Key13776