Physical, cognitive, and social activities as mediators between personality and cognition: evidence from four prospective samples.

TitlePhysical, cognitive, and social activities as mediators between personality and cognition: evidence from four prospective samples.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsStephan, Y, Sutin, AR, Luchetti, M, Aschwanden, D, Terracciano, A
JournalAging & Mental Health
Pagination1-10
ISSN Number1364-6915
Keywordsactivities, Aging, Cognition, lifestyle, longitudinal, Personality
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined how activity engagement mediates the association between personality and cognition.

METHODS: Participants were middle-aged and older adults (Age range: 24-93 years;  > 16,000) from the Midlife in the United States Study, the Health and Retirement Study, the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study of Aging. In each sample, personality traits and demographic factors were assessed at baseline, engagement in cognitive, physical, and social activities was assessed in a second wave, and cognition was measured in a third wave, 8 to 20 years later.

RESULTS: Random-effect meta-analyses indicated that lower neuroticism and higher extraversion, openness, and conscientiousness were prospectively associated with better cognition. Most of these associations were partly mediated by greater engagement in physical and cognitive activities but not social activities. Physical activity accounted for 7% (neuroticism) to 50% (extraversion) and cognitive activity accounted for 14% (neuroticism) to 45% (extraversion) of the association with cognition.

CONCLUSION: The present study provides replicable evidence that physical and cognitive activities partly mediate the prospective association between personality traits and cognitive functioning.

DOI10.1080/13607863.2024.2320135
Citation Key13793
PubMed ID38410951