Effect of stress coping strategies on comfort foods consumption: evidence from older Americans

TitleEffect of stress coping strategies on comfort foods consumption: evidence from older Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsShen, A, Liu, S
JournalBritish Food Journal
Keywordscomfort foods, coping strategies, Older Americans, Stress
Abstract

Purpose
Comfort foods consumption and linkages to stress coping strategies have received little attention in the business research on food products and services. This paper aims to explore comfort foods consumption among older Americans and how stress-coping strategies are related to their consumption frequency and variety of comfort foods.

Design/methodology/approach
Older Americans aged 50–99 years (N = 1,428) in the Health and Retirement Study were surveyed on their frequency and variety of comfort foods consumption and their consumption coping strategies. Data were analyzed and regression models were estimated.

Findings
Demographically, baby boomer, male, and non-Hispanic whites reported higher frequency and variety of comfort foods consumption. Comfort foods consumption in frequency and variety was significantly higher (lower) when “eat more” (“use alcohol”) was the endorsed coping strategy.

Originality/value
Research findings furthered research on the consumption of comfort foods among older American adults and added new insights into their coping behavior, both of which may help businesses be more targeted in serving comfort foods to the mature market and the public sector to tailor their services to older adults.

DOI10.1108/BFJ-12-2023-1119
Citation Key13826