Pain trajectories and their associations with cognition among older adults: a 10-year cohort study from network perspective.

TitlePain trajectories and their associations with cognition among older adults: a 10-year cohort study from network perspective.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsSun, H-L, Bai, W, Chen, P, Zhang, L, Smith, RD, Su, Z, Cheung, T, Ungvari, GS, Ng, CH, Zhang, Q, Xiang, Y-T
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume53
Issue3
ISSN Number1468-2834
KeywordsAged, Cognition, Cognition Disorders, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, pain
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the associations between pain trajectories and cognitive function in older adults. This study explored the associations between pain trajectories and different cognitive domains in older adults from a network perspective.

METHODS: Data on pain trajectories were derived from the Health and Retirement Study between 2010 and 2020 using latent class growth analyses. Measurements of key cognition domains, including memory, attention, calculation, orientation and language, were included. Linear regression and network analysis were performed to evaluate the associations between different pain trajectories and cognition.

RESULTS: A total of 9,551 older adults were included in this study and three trajectories of pain were identified. After controlling for the covariates, persistent severe pain trajectory was associated with poorer overall cognition, memory and calculation ability when compared to mild or non-persistent pain trajectory. In the pain and cognition network model, memory (expected influence (EI) = 0.62), language (EI = 0.58) and calculation (EI = 0.41) were the most central domains.

CONCLUSIONS: Pain trajectories appeared stable over time among older adults in this study. Severity of persistent pain was an important risk factor for poor cognition, especially in relation to memory and calculation domains. Interventions targeting memory, language and calculation domains might be useful in addressing cognitive decline in older adults with persistent pain.

DOI10.1093/ageing/afae054
Citation Key13848
PubMed ID38521972
PubMed Central IDPMC10960922
Grant ListNIA U01AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States