Association of Epigenetic Age and Everyday Discrimination With Longitudinal Trajectories of Chronic Health Conditions in Older Adults.

TitleAssociation of Epigenetic Age and Everyday Discrimination With Longitudinal Trajectories of Chronic Health Conditions in Older Adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsMutambudzi, M, Brown, MT, Chen, N-W
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume79
Issue3
ISSN Number1758-535X
KeywordsAged, Aging, Black or African American, DNA Methylation, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epigenomics, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Logistic Models, Social Discrimination
Abstract

We investigated the strength of the association between baseline epigenetic age, everyday discrimination, and trajectories of chronic health conditions (CHCs) across 3 study waves, among adults 50 years of age and older. We used 2016-2020 data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Data for the PhenoAge and DNAm GrimAge second-generation epigenetic clocks were from the 2016 HRS Venous Blood Study. CHC trajectories were constructed using latent class growth curve models. Multinomial logistic regression models assessed the strength of the association between accelerated epigenetic age, everyday discrimination, and the newly constructed CHC trajectories for participants with complete data (n = 2 893). In the fully adjusted model, accelerated PhenoAge (relative risk ratios [RRR] = 2.53, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.81, 3.55) and DNAm GrimAge (RRR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.95, 4.00) were associated with classification into the high CHC trajectory class. Racial disparities were evident, with increased risk of classification into the high trajectory class for Black (PhenoAge: RRR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.68) and reduced risk for Hispanic (PhenoAge: RRR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.16, 0.64; DNAm GrimAge: RRR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.17, 0.68), relative to White participants. Everyday discrimination was associated with classification into the medium-high (RRR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.00, 1.64) and high (RRR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.16) trajectory classes in models assessing DNAm GrimAge. More research is needed to better understand the longitudinal health outcomes of accelerated aging and adverse social exposures. Such research may provide insights into vulnerable adults who may need varied welfare supports earlier than the mandated chronological age for access to federal and state resources.

DOI10.1093/gerona/glae005
Citation Key13897
PubMed ID38190429
PubMed Central IDPMC10878241
Grant ListP30 AG017265 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30AG017265 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States