Association between pain interference and motoric cognitive risk syndrome in older adults: a population-based cohort study.

TitleAssociation between pain interference and motoric cognitive risk syndrome in older adults: a population-based cohort study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsLi, G, He, Z, Hu, J, Xiao, C, Fan, W, Zhang, Z, Yao, Q, Zou, J, Huang, G, Zeng, Q
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume24
Issue1
Pagination437
ISSN Number1471-2318
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, pain, Population Surveillance, Risk Factors, Syndrome
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR) is a pre-dementia condition characterized by subjective complaints in cognition and slow gait. Pain interference has previously been linked with cognitive deterioration; however, its specific relationship with MCR remains unclear. We aimed to examine how pain interference is associated with concurrent and incident MCR.

METHODS: This study included older adults aged ≥ 65 years without dementia from the Health and Retirement Study. We combined participants with MCR information in 2006 and 2008 as baseline, and the participants were followed up 4 and 8 years later. The states of pain interference were divided into 3 categories: interfering pain, non-interfering pain, and no pain. Logistic regression analysis was done at baseline to examine the associations between pain interference and concurrent MCR. During the 8-year follow-up, Cox regression analysis was done to investigate the associations between pain interference and incident MCR.

RESULTS: The study included 7120 older adults (74.6 ± 6.7 years; 56.8% females) at baseline. The baseline prevalence of MCR was 5.7%. Individuals with interfering pain had a significantly increased risk of MCR (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.17-1.95; p = 0.001). The longitudinal analysis included 4605 participants, and there were 284 (6.2%) MCR cases on follow-up. Participants with interfering pain at baseline had a higher risk for MCR at 8 years of follow-up (HR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.52-2.69; p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Older adults with interfering pain had a higher risk for MCR versus those with non-interfering pain or without pain. Timely and adequate management of interfering pain may contribute to the prevention and treatment of MCR and its associated adverse outcomes.

DOI10.1186/s12877-024-04974-7
Citation Key13997
PubMed ID38760712
PubMed Central IDPMC11102256
Grant List82072528 / / National Natural Science Foundation of China /
82002380 / / National Natural Science Foundation of China /
2022A1515012460 / / Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province /
DCMST-NHC-2019-AHT-01 / / National Health Commission multi-center collaborative horizontal research project /