Falls and subsequent cognitive function in older adults in England and the USA, 2010–2020: a population-based, cross-nationally harmonized, longitudinal study

TitleFalls and subsequent cognitive function in older adults in England and the USA, 2010–2020: a population-based, cross-nationally harmonized, longitudinal study
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsKou, W, Shi, S, Huang, J, Xie, Y, Qiu, P
Series TitleResearch Square
KeywordsCognitive decline, Falls, multiple falls, Older people
Abstract

INTRODUCTION:
The understanding of the long-term cognitive consequences of falls remains insufficient. Our research aims to explore
the association between falls and domain-specific cognitive decline, utilizing nationally representative aging cohorts.
METHODS
We studied 13,652 individuals from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and the Health and Retirement
Study (HRS). Linear mixed-effects models estimated associations between falls and domain-specific cognitive decline
(z-standardized) and rates of cognitive change.
RESULTS
Individuals with a single fall (pooled β = -0.007; 95% CI, -0.013 to -0.002; P = 0.006) and those with multiple falls (pooled
β = -0.021; 95% CI, -0.026 to -0.016; P < 0.001) experienced a faster decline in global cognitive z scores compared to no
history of falls. Similar patterns were observed across memory, executive, and orientation functions.
DISCUSSION
In this combined cohort study, including samples from ELSA and HRS, we discerned a marked association between the
falls and domain-specific cognitive decline.

DOI10.21203/rs.3.rs-4411264/v1
Citation Key14006