High-impact pain is associated with epigenetic aging among middle-aged and older adults: Findings from the Health and Retirement Study.

TitleHigh-impact pain is associated with epigenetic aging among middle-aged and older adults: Findings from the Health and Retirement Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2024
AuthorsTamargo, JA, Strath, LJ, Cruz-Almeida, Y
JournalJ Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci
Date Published2024 Jun 10
ISSN Number1758-535X
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain has been associated with accelerated biological aging, which may be related to epigenetic alterations. We evaluated the association of high-impact pain (i.e., pain that limits activities and function) with epigenetic aging, a measure of biological aging, in a nationally representative sample of middle-aged and older adults in the United States.

METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of adults 50 years of age and older from the 2016 Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Epigenetic aging was derived from 13 epigenetic clocks based on DNA methylation patterns that predict aging correlates of morbidity and mortality. Ordinary least squares regressions were performed to test for differences in the epigenetic clocks, adjusting for the complex survey design, as well as biological, social, and behavioral factors.

RESULTS: The analysis consisted of 3,855 adults with mean age of 68.5 years, including 59.8% with no pain and 25.8% with high-impact pain. Consistent with its operational definition, high-impact pain was associated with greater functional and activity limitations. High-impact pain was associated with accelerated epigenetic aging compared to no pain, as measured via second (Zhang, PhenoAge, GrimAge) and third (DunedinPoAm) generation epigenetic clocks. Additionally, GrimAge was accelerated in high-impact pain as compared to low-impact pain.

CONCLUSIONS: High-impact pain is associated with accelerated epigenetic aging among middle-aged and older adults in the United States. These findings highlight aging-associated epigenetic alterations in high-impact chronic pain and suggest a potential for epigenetic therapeutic approaches for pain management and the preservation of physical function in older adults.

DOI10.1093/gerona/glae149
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/38855906?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalJ Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci
Citation Key14022
PubMed ID38855906