How Does Employment-Based Insurance Coverage Relate to Health After Early Retirement?

TitleHow Does Employment-Based Insurance Coverage Relate to Health After Early Retirement?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of PublicationForthcoming
AuthorsKail, BL
JournalThe Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
KeywordsInsurance, Other, Pensions, Public Policy, Retirement Planning and Satisfaction
Abstract

The health consequences of retirement are generally ambiguous. Although health tends to improve for some people, for others, retirement seems to have a negligible impact on health. This study used data from the Health and Retirement Study and two-stage mixed effects regression models to assess (a) whether changes in employment-based insurance coverage were related to subsequent symptoms of depression and activities of daily living limitations (ADLs) and (b) whether the linkages between employment-based insurance and subsequent health were particularly salient for people who transitioned from full-time work to full retirement before becoming eligible for Medicare at age 65. Findings: (1) Those who lost employment-based insurance suffered from more symptoms of depression and ADLs than those who had continuous employment-based insurance. (2) After adjusting for the influence of prior health on transitioning to retirement, early retirees suffered from more symptoms of depression and ADLs than the continuously employed. (3) Employment-based insurance appears to be an important contextual factor in the retirement transition. In the context of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), these findings suggest that early retirees will do well if employers are incentivized to offer retirement insurance.

URLhttp://psychsocgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/03/17/geronb.gbw020.short
DOI10.1093/geronb/gbw020
Endnote Keywords

retirement planning/public policy/transitions/insurance Coverage/employee benefits

Endnote ID

999999

Citation Key6488
PubMed ID26988867