Using an Alzheimer Disease Polygenic Risk Score to Predict Memory Decline in Black and White Americans Over 14 Years of Follow-up.

TitleUsing an Alzheimer Disease Polygenic Risk Score to Predict Memory Decline in Black and White Americans Over 14 Years of Follow-up.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMarden, JR, Mayeda, ER, Walter, S, Vivot, A, Tchetgen, EJTchetgen, Kawachi, I, M Glymour, M
JournalAlzheimer Dis Assoc Disord
Volume30
Issue3
Pagination195-202
Date Published2016 Jul-Sep
ISSN Number1546-4156
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Alzheimer disease, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Memory Disorders, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

<p>Evidence on whether genetic predictors of Alzheimer disease (AD) also predict memory decline is inconsistent, and limited data are available for African ancestry populations. For 8253 non-Hispanic white (NHW) and non-Hispanic black (NHB) Health and Retirement Study participants with memory scores measured 1 to 8 times between 1998 and 2012 (average baseline age=62), we calculated weighted polygenic risk scores [AD Genetic Risk Score (AD-GRS)] using the top 22 AD-associated loci, and an alternative score excluding apolipoprotein E (APOE) (AD-GRSexAPOE). We used generalized linear models with AD-GRS-by-age and AD-GRS-by-age interactions (age centered at 70) to predict memory decline. Average NHB decline was 26% faster than NHW decline (P<0.001). Among NHW, 10% higher AD-GRS predicted faster memory decline (linear β=-0.058 unit decrease over 10 y; 95% confidence interval,-0.074 to -0.043). AD-GRSexAPOE also predicted faster decline for NHW, although less strongly. Among NHB, AD-GRS predicted faster memory decline (linear β=-0.050; 95% confidence interval, -0.106 to 0.006), but AD-GRSexAPOE did not. Our nonsignificant estimate among NHB may reflect insufficient statistical power or a misspecified AD-GRS among NHB as an overwhelming majority of genome-wide association studies are conducted in NHW. A polygenic score based on previously identified AD loci predicts memory loss in US blacks and whites.</p>

URLhttp://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/26756387
DOI10.1097/WAD.0000000000000137
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26756387?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Gene Ontology/Diseases/Genes/Proteins

Endnote ID

999999

Alternate JournalAlzheimer Dis Assoc Disord
Citation Key6498
PubMed ID26756387
PubMed Central IDPMC4940299
Grant ListP30 AG015272 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI104459 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
T32 NS048005 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States