Distribution and association of chronic disease and mobility difficulty across four body mass index categories of African-American women.

TitleDistribution and association of chronic disease and mobility difficulty across four body mass index categories of African-American women.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsClark, DO, Mungai, SM
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume145
Issue10
Pagination865-75
Date Published1997 May 15
ISSN Number0002-9262
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, African Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Chronic disease, Comorbidity, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Michigan, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Regression Analysis, Severity of Illness Index, Socioeconomic factors
Abstract

A majority of African-American women over the age of 50 are obese, have at least one chronic disease, and experience mobility difficulty. Using self-reported data from the 1992 Health and Retirement Study of 1,150 African-American women aged 30-70 years, this report first compares chronic disease prevalence and severity, pain, sensory deficits, and mobility difficulty across four categories of body mass index and, second, investigates whether body mass index affects the association of chronic disease with mobility difficulty. Body mass index was categorized as low, medium, high, and severe, being equal to 19-24 (20%), 25-29 (38%), 30-34 (24%), and 35 or over (18%), respectively. There were few differences when comparing the medium category with either the low or high category. Those in the severe body mass index category, however, reported significantly more frequent and severe hypertension, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, arthritis, pain, sensory deficits, and mobility difficulty than did those in the medium body mass index category. Obesity did not appear to affect the association between chronic disease and mobility difficulty. The relatively high rates of mobility difficulty observed among the severe body mass index group appear to be more likely a result of relatively high chronic disease prevalence and severity than to a disproportionate impact of these on mobility.

DOI10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a009046
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9149658?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Mobility Difficulty/Health Status/Basic Demographics/Economic Status/Labor

Endnote ID

8114

Alternate JournalAm J Epidemiol
Citation Key6592
PubMed ID9149658
Grant ListR29-AG-12987 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States