Economic, Cultural, and Social Origins of Emotional Well-Being: Comparisons of Immigrants and Natives at Midlife

TitleEconomic, Cultural, and Social Origins of Emotional Well-Being: Comparisons of Immigrants and Natives at Midlife
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsHao, L, Johnson, R
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume22
Issue6
Pagination599-629
Call Numberpubs_2000_Hao-JohnsonRA.pdf
KeywordsDemographics, Health Conditions and Status, Other
Abstract

Linking theories of social stratification, ethnicity, and mental health with theories of human and social capital, the authors examine the impact of economic, cultural, and social factors on five different dimensions of emotional well-being for immigrants and natives at midlife. Based on data from the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study, the authors found that economic factors and human capital variables are the most important determinants of emotional health for both immigrants and natives. The results indicate that cultural factors can enhance emotional well-being. Religious affiliation and participation are important for both immigrants and natives, but religious participation appears to be more beneficial for immigrants. Being part of a couple was also associated with better emotional health, especially for immigrants. The effects of several determinants of emotional health differed across immigrant groups. It was found that marriage, education, and the presence of economically stable kin are particularly important for Cubans. 6 Tables, 36 References. Adapted from the source document

URLhttp://roa.sagepub.com/archive/
Endnote Keywords

Social Stratification/Cultural Capital/Socioeconomic Factors/Mental Health/Well Being/Immigrants/Religiosity/Middle Aged Adults/Nativism

Endnote ID

1252

Citation Key6686