Racial, Ethnic, and Sociodemographic Differences in the level of Psychosocial Distress Among Older Americans

TitleRacial, Ethnic, and Sociodemographic Differences in the level of Psychosocial Distress Among Older Americans
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsMills, TL, Henretta, JC
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume23
Issue2
Pagination131-152
Call Numberpubs_2001_Mills_TRoA.pdf
KeywordsDemographics, Health Conditions and Status, Net Worth and Assets, Women and Minorities
Abstract

This paper explores the reasons for the observed differences in the level of self-reported depressive symptoms between older African Americans, Hispanic-English speaking, Hispanic-Spanish speaking, and Whites. For all groups in the sample, being male, married, having a high level of education, and good health are strong indicators of lower levels of depressive symptoms. Comparing the levels of self-reported depressive symptoms among the different racial/ethnic groups demonstrated that there are large differences, with the Hispanic-Spanish speaking individuals reporting the highest scores. Results show that language acculturation, the number of years of education, and the number of years of U.S. residency are significant factors that help to explain these differences.

URLhttp://roa.sagepub.com/archive/
Endnote Keywords

Depressive Symptoms/African-Americans/Hispanics/Whites/Economic Status/Health Status/Acculturation

Endnote ID

8524

Citation Key6766