Socioeconomic Differences in Having Living Parents and Children: A U.S.-British Comparison of Middle-Aged Women

TitleSocioeconomic Differences in Having Living Parents and Children: A U.S.-British Comparison of Middle-Aged Women
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsHenretta, JC, Grundy, EM, Harris, S
JournalJournal of Marriage and the Family
Volume63
Pagination852-867
Call Numberpubs_2001_Henretta_JJMandF.pdf
KeywordsAdult children, Demographics
Abstract

The authors observe the differences in socioeconomic status among women in Britain and the U.S. who have living parents as well as children in the middle-aged cohort. Those people in the middle generation are likely to encounter many demands, both from their parents and their children. What is the magnitude of the socioeconomic effects in these two countries? What is the pattern of socioeconomic differences in parent survival when inspecting the socioeconomic status of the middle-aged children? Data from the 1988 Office of National Statistics Retirement and Retirement Plans Survey was gathered for the British population and compared to Wave 1 (1992) and Wave 2 (1994) of the Health and Retirement Study. Findings from this study are that: (1) the U.S. has much greater levels of kin availability; (2) the pattern of socioeconomic effects is rather similar between the two countries; (3) socioeconomic status is negatively correlated with the number of children one has; and (4) people with greater socioeconomic status are more likely to have a living parent and children. Policies that change the amount of responsibility a person has with regard to other generations of the family will have differing consequences depending on the country, status, and whom the policy is concerning (elderly or young).

Endnote Keywords

Family/Socioeconomic Differences/Family Structure

Endnote ID

8556

Citation Key6769