Loss of health insurance and the risk for a decline in self-reported health and physical functioning.

TitleLoss of health insurance and the risk for a decline in self-reported health and physical functioning.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsBaker, DW, Sudano, JJ, Albert, JM, Borawski, EA, Dor, A
JournalMed Care
Volume40
Issue11
Pagination1126-31
Date Published2002 Nov
ISSN Number0025-7079
KeywordsFemale, Health Services Accessibility, Health Status, Humans, Insurance, Health, Male, Medically Uninsured, Middle Aged, Regression Analysis, Risk, Self Efficacy
Abstract

<p><b>BACKGROUND: </b>Millions of Americans are intermittently uninsured. The health consequences of this are not known.</p><p><b>SETTING: </b>National survey.</p><p><b>PARTICIPANTS: </b>Six thousand seventy-two participants in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) age 51 to 61 years old with private insurance in 1992.</p><p><b>MEASUREMENTS: </b>Loss of insurance coverage between 1992 and 1992 and development of a major decline in overall health or a new physical difficulty between 1994 and 1996.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>In 1994, 5768 (95.0%) people continued to have private insurance, 229 (3.8%) reported having lost all insurance, and 75 (1.2%) converted to having only public insurance. Over the subsequent 2 years (1994-1996), the risk for a major decline in overall health was 15.6% for those who lost all insurance versus 7.2% for those with continuous private insurance (P <0.001). After adjusting for baseline sociodemographics, health behaviors, and health status, the adjusted relative risk for a major decline in health for those who lost coverage was 1.82 (95% CI, 1.25-2.59) compared with those with continuous private insurance. Those who lost insurance also had a higher risk for developing a new mobility difficulty compared with those with continuous private insurance (28.5% vs. 20.4%, respectively; P= 0.02), but this was not significant in multivariate analysis (adjusted RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.90-1.68).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>Loss of insurance has adverse health consequences even within 2 years after becoming uninsured. Studies of insurance coverage should routinely measure the number of Americans uninsured at any time over the preceding 2 years as a more accurate measure of the population at risk from being uninsured.</p>

DOI10.1097/00005650-200211000-00013
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12409857?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalMed Care
Citation Key6828
PubMed ID12409857
Grant ListR01 HS10283-01 / HS / AHRQ HHS / United States