Major depression in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults: Prevalence and 2- and 4-year follow-up symptoms.

TitleMajor depression in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults: Prevalence and 2- and 4-year follow-up symptoms.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsMojtabai, R, Olfson, M
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume34
Issue4
Pagination623-634
KeywordsHealth Conditions and Status
Abstract

This study examined the demographic, socio-economic and clinical factors associated with major depression and with persistence of depressive symptoms at 2- and 4-year follow-ups in a large population sample of middle-aged and older adults. In a sample of 9747 participants aged over 50 in the 1996 wave of the US Health and Retirement Study, the authors assessed the 12-month prevalence of major depression using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview - Short Form (CIDI-SF). The 12-month prevalence of CIDI-SF major depression was 6.6 . With age, prevalence declined, but the likelihood of significant depressive symptoms at follow-ups increased. Both prevalence and persistence of significant depressive symptoms at follow-ups were associated with socio-economic disadvantage and physical illness. Persistence of depressive symptoms at follow-ups was also associated with symptoms of anhedonia, feelings of worthlessness, and thoughts of death at baseline. Sociodemographic, physical health and a specific profile of depressive symptoms are associated with a poorer course of major depression in the middle-aged and older adults. These indicators may identify a subgroup of patients in need of more careful follow-up and intensive treatment.

Endnote Keywords

Depression

Endnote ID

13682

Citation Key6969