Race, gender, and the retirement decisions of people ages 60 to 80: prospects for age integration in employment.

TitleRace, gender, and the retirement decisions of people ages 60 to 80: prospects for age integration in employment.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsMcNamara, TK, Williamson, JB
JournalInt J Aging Hum Dev
Volume59
Issue3
Pagination255-86
Date Published2004
ISSN Number0091-4150
KeywordsAfrican Continental Ancestry Group, Age Distribution, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Educational Status, Employment, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Status, Humans, Income, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Retirement, Sex Distribution
Abstract

UNLABELLED: Demographic projections have prompted concerns about the potential economic burden of an aging population. This article, drawing on the 1998 Health and Retirement Study, explores ways in which race, gender, and age moderate the effects of various factors on labor force participation among people ages 60 to 80. Key findings center on health, education, and non-wage income. First, the effect of low non-wage income is weaker at older ages due to higher levels of functional disability. Second, the effect of low education is stronger for women, who perceive their chances of finding employment as low. Third, the effect of health is weaker for blacks, as they are less likely to find steady employment regardless of health.

POLICY IMPLICATIONS: Employer flexibility in number of hours worked might make sense for workers close to retirement age, while job search and training programs might be preferable for workers past the typical retirement age.

DOI10.2190/GE24-03MX-U34P-AMNH
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15566013?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Racial disparities/Labor Force Participation

Endnote ID

13692

Alternate JournalInt J Aging Hum Dev
Citation Key6970
PubMed ID15566013