Number of Children Associated with Obesity in Middle-Aged Women and Men: Results from the health and retirement study.

TitleNumber of Children Associated with Obesity in Middle-Aged Women and Men: Results from the health and retirement study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsWeng, HH, Bastian, LA, Taylor, Jr., DH, Ostbye, T
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume12
Issue1
Pagination85-91
Call Numberpubs_2004_Weng_etal.pdf
KeywordsHealth Conditions and Status
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study associations between number of children and obesity in middle-aged women and men. METHODS: In the Health and Retirement Study, a national survey of households, we tested the association between increasing number of children and obesity (body mass index BMI or= 30) in 9046 middle-aged women and men (4523 couples). RESULTS: Women (n = 4523) who were obese were more frequently nonwhite, reported lower household income, were more frequently employed outside the home, were less frequently covered by health insurance, and were more frequently less educated compared with nonobese women. Men (n = 4523) who were obese were younger, were more frequently African American, and were more frequently less educated and poorer compared with nonobese men. Among women, a 7 increase in risk of obesity was noted for each additional child, adjusting for age, race, household income, work status, physical activity, tobacco use, and alcohol use. Among men, a 4 increase in risk of obesity was noted for each additional child, adjusting for the same covariates. These sex differences were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: Previous research has demonstrated an association between number of children and obesity among women. These results suggest a similar association among men. Public health interventions focused on obesity prevention should target both parents, especially those parents with several children.

Endnote Keywords

Obesity

Endnote ID

13712

Citation Key6972