What Level of Alcohol Consumption Is Hazardous for Older People? Functioning and Mortality in U.S. and English National Cohorts

TitleWhat Level of Alcohol Consumption Is Hazardous for Older People? Functioning and Mortality in U.S. and English National Cohorts
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsLang, IA, Guralnik, JM, Wallace, RB, Meltzer, DO
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume55
Issue1
Pagination49-
Call Numbernewpubs20070125Lang_etal_JAGS
KeywordsCross-National, Health Conditions and Status, Methodology
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To estimate disability plus mortality risks in older people according to level of alcohol intake. DESIGN: Two population-based cohort studies. SETTING: The Health and Retirement Study (United States) and the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (England). PARTICIPANTS: Thirteen thousand three hundred thirtythree individuals aged 65 and older followed for 4 to 5 years. MEASUREMENTS: Difficulties with activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), poor cognitive function, and mortality. RESULTS: One-tenth (10.8 ) of U.S. men, 28.6 of English men, 2.9 of U.S. women, and 10.3 of English women drank more than the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism recommended limit for people aged 65 and older. Odds ratios (ORs) of disability, or disability plus mortality, in subjects drinking an average of more than one to two drinks per day were similar to ORs in subjects drinking an average of more than none to one drink per day. For example, those drinking more than one to two drinks per day at baseline had an OR of 1.0 (95 confidence interval (CI)50.8 1.2) for ADL problems, 0.7 (95 CI50.6 1.0) for IADL problems, and 0.8 (95 CI5 0.6 1.1) for poor cognitive function. Findings were robust across alternative models. The shape of the relationship between alcohol consumption and risk of disability was similar in men and women. CONCLUSION: Functioning and mortality outcomes in older people with alcohol intakes above U.S. recommended levels for the old but within recommendations for younger adults are not poor. More empirical evidence of net benefit is needed to support screening and intervention efforts in community-living older people with no specific contraindications who drink more than one to two drinks per day.

Endnote Keywords

ADL and IADL Impairments/Alcohol Drinking/Cross Cultural Comparison/aging/ELSA_/cross-national comparison

Endnote ID

16930

Citation Key7125