Childhood Social and Economic Well-Being and Health in Older Age

TitleChildhood Social and Economic Well-Being and Health in Older Age
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsMoody-Ayers, S, Lindquist, K, Sen, S, Covinsky, KE
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume166
Pagination1059-1067
Call Numbernewpubs20071203_ChildSES_AJE.pdf
KeywordsAdult children, Demographics, Health Conditions and Status
Abstract

Childhood socioeconomic status (SES) acts over a lifetime to influence adult health outcomes. Whether the impact of childhood SES differs by age or race/ethnicity is unclear. The authors studied 20,566 community-living US adults aged 50 years. Parental education was the main predictor. Outcomes evaluated (1998 2002) included self-reported health and functional limitation. The influence of childhood SES on later-life health was also examined in groups stratified by age and race/ethnicity, with adjustment for demographic factors and current SES. Participants mean age was 67 years; 57 were women. By race/ethnicity, 76 were White, 14 were Black, and 8 were Latino. The relation between low parental education and fair/poor self-rated health declined with advancing age (age 50 64 years: adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.42, 95 confidence interval (CI): 1.24, 1.63; age 80 years: AOR 1.14, 95 CI: 0.96, 1.36). The relation between low parental education and fair/poor self-rated health differed across racial/ethnic groups and was significant in White (AOR 1.33, 95 CI: 1.21, 1.47) and Black (AOR 1.37, 95 CI: 1.14, 1.64) participants but not Latinos. These findings suggest that childhood SES affects health status through midlife but the effects may abate in late life; its effects also may be weaker in Latinos than in Whites or Blacks.

Endnote Keywords

childhood conditions/Socioeconomic Status/health status/Activities of Daily Living/Mobility Difficulty/Frail Elderly

Endnote ID

18270

Citation Key7165