Correlates of improvement in walking ability in older persons in the United States.

TitleCorrelates of improvement in walking ability in older persons in the United States.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsFeinglass, J, Song, J, Manheim, LM, Semanik, P, Chang, RW, Dunlop, DD
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume99
Issue3
Pagination533-9
Date Published2009 Mar
ISSN Number1541-0048
Call Numbernewpubs20090302_Feinglass_etal.pdf
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Confidence Intervals, Female, Health Promotion, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Overweight, Smoking Prevention, Social Marketing, Socioeconomic factors, United States, Walking
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We analyzed factors associated with improvement in walking ability among respondents to the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study.

METHODS: We analyzed data from 6574 respondents aged 53 years or older who reported difficulty walking several blocks, 1 block, or across the room in 2000 or 2002. We examined associations between improvement (versus no change, deterioration, or death) and baseline health status, chronic conditions, baseline walking difficulty, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, and behavioral risk factors.

RESULTS: Among the 25% of the study population with baseline walking limitations, 29% experienced improved walking ability, 40% experienced no change in walking ability, and 31% experienced deteriorated walking ability or died. In a multivariate analysis, we found positive associations between walking improvement and more recent onset and more severe walking difficulty, being overweight, and engaging in vigorous physical activity. A history of diabetes, having any difficulty with activities of daily living, and being a current smoker were all negatively associated with improvement in walking ability. After we controlled for baseline health, improvement in walking ability was equally likely among racial and ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status.

CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to reduce smoking and to increase physical activity may help improve walking ability in older Americans.

Notes

PMID 19106418

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2008.142927
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19106418?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Health Physical/aging

Endnote ID

19710

Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
Citation Key7315
PubMed ID19106418
PubMed Central IDPMC2661455
Grant ListR01 HD045412-03 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR025741 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AR055287 / AR / NIAMS NIH HHS / United States
P60 AR048098 / AR / NIAMS NIH HHS / United States
R01 AR055287-01A1 / AR / NIAMS NIH HHS / United States
R01 HD045412 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
P60 AR048098-070006 / AR / NIAMS NIH HHS / United States