Diabetes-related support, regimen adherence, and health decline among older adults.

TitleDiabetes-related support, regimen adherence, and health decline among older adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsNicklett, EJ, Liang, J
JournalJ Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
Volume65B
Issue3
Pagination390-9
Date Published2010 May
ISSN Number1758-5368
Call Numbernewpubs20090908_Nicklett.pdf
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disability Evaluation, Female, Health Behavior, Health Status, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Compliance, Quality of Life, Social Support, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

<p><b>UNLABELLED: </b>OBJECTIVES. Social support is generally conceptualized as health promoting; however, there is little consensus regarding the mechanisms through which support is protective. Illness support has been proposed to promote regimen adherence and subsequent prevention of health decline. We hypothesize that (a) support for regimen adherence is negatively associated with self-reported health decline among older diabetic adults and that (b) regimen adherence is negatively associated with health decline among older diabetic adults.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>We used the Health and Retirement Study data on individuals over the age of 60 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 1,788), examining change in self-reported health status over a 2-year period using binomial and cumulative ordinal logistic regression models.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Diabetic support is not significantly associated with health decline, but it is strongly associated with adherence to health-promoting activities consisting of a diabetic regimen. Therefore, the extent to which one receives illness support for a given regimen component is highly positively associated with adhering to that component, although this adherence does not necessarily translate into protection against perceived decline in health.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>Illness-related support appears to be a mechanism through which social support matters in the diabetic population. Although this relationship did not extend to prevention of health status decline among diabetics, the relationship between support and illness management is promising.</p>

Notes

PMID: 19541672

DOI10.1093/geronb/gbp050
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19541672?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Chronic Illness/diabetes/Health care management

Endnote ID

20640

Alternate JournalJ Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
Citation Key7339
PubMed ID19541672
PubMed Central IDPMC2853599
Grant ListP60-AG08808 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01-AG028116 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01-AG154124 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States