Social Ties and Depression: An Intersectional Examination of Black and White Community-Dwelling Older Adults

TitleSocial Ties and Depression: An Intersectional Examination of Black and White Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsMair, CA
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume29
Issue6
Pagination667-696
Call Numbernewpubs20110328_Mair.pdf
KeywordsDemographics, Health Conditions and Status, Other
Abstract

Aging literature often links social ties to lower depression for older adults; however, research shows inconsistent findings by race and gender. Drawing from an intersectionality framework, this article explores whether the relationship between social ties and depression is moderated by race and gender for a nationally representative sample of diverse, community-dwelling older adults (aged 60 and older). Analysis of the most recent wave of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) indicates that White men, Black men, White women, and Black women differ in terms of the relationship between social ties and depression. Main findings include (a) the overwhelming benefit of marriage and partnership, (b) pronounced differences between Black women s and White women s friend and kin ties, and (c) the potential vulnerability of older Black men. Findings highlight the importance of catering community-based elder support toward diverse aging populations. Potential community-based care solutions are discussed.

URLhttp://jag.sagepub.com/content/29/6/667
Endnote Keywords

social ties/depression/intersectionality/gender

Endnote ID

24560

Citation Key7523