Assessment of cognition using surveys and neuropsychological assessment: the Health and Retirement Study and the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study.

TitleAssessment of cognition using surveys and neuropsychological assessment: the Health and Retirement Study and the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsCrimmins, EM, Kim, JKi, Langa, KM, Weir, DR
JournalJ Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
Volume66 Suppl 1
Paginationi162-71
Date Published2011 Jul
ISSN Number1758-5368
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cognition, Cognition Disorders, Dementia, Educational Status, Female, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Neuropsychological tests, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Sex Factors, United States
Abstract

<p><b>OBJECTIVES: </b>This study examines the similarity of cognitive assessments using 1 interview in a large population study, the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), and a subsample in which a detailed neuropsychiatric assessment has been performed (Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study [ADAMS]).</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>Respondents are diagnosed in ADAMS as demented, cognitively impaired without dementia (CIND), or as having normal cognitive function. Multinomial logistic analysis is used to predict diagnosis using a variety of cognitive and noncognitive measures from the HRS and additional measures and information from ADAMS.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>The cognitive tests in HRS predict the ADAMS diagnosis in 74% of the sample able to complete the HRS survey on their own. Proxy respondents answer for a large proportion of HRS respondents who are diagnosed as demented in ADAMS. Classification of proxy respondents with some cognitive impairment can be predicted in 86% of the sample. Adding a small number of additional tests from ADAMS can increase each of these percentages to 84% and 93%, respectively.</p><p><b>DISCUSSION: </b>Cognitive assessment appropriate for diagnosis of dementia and CIND in large population surveys could be improved with more targeted information from informants and additional cognitive tests targeting other areas of brain function.</p>

Notes

Crimmins, Eileen M Kim, Jung Ki Langa, Kenneth M Weir, David R P30 AG17265/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States U01 AG009740/AG/NIA NIH HHS/United States Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural United States The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2011 Jul;66 Suppl 1:i162-71.

DOI10.1093/geronb/gbr048
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21743047?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Age Factors/Aged, 80 and over/Cognition/Cognition Disorders/ diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology/Cognition Disorders/ diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology/Dementia/ diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology/Dementia/ diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology/Educational Status/Female/Logistic Models/Longitudinal Studies/Multivariate Analysis/Neuropsychological Tests/Odds Ratio/Prevalence/Sex Factors/United States/epidemiology/United States/epidemiology

Endnote ID

62734

Alternate JournalJ Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
Citation Key7631
PubMed ID21743047
PubMed Central IDPMC3165454
Grant ListP30 AG017265 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG17265 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
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