Limited lung function: impact of reduced peak expiratory flow on health status, health-care utilization, and expected survival in older adults.

TitleLimited lung function: impact of reduced peak expiratory flow on health status, health-care utilization, and expected survival in older adults.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsRoberts, MH, Mapel, DW
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume176
Issue2
Pagination127-34
Date Published2012 Jul 15
ISSN Number1476-6256
KeywordsActivities of Daily Living, Aged, Chronic disease, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Health Services, Health Status, Heart Diseases, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Lung Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Odds Ratio, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate, Population Surveillance, Stroke, United States
Abstract

<p>The authors examined whether peak expiratory flow (PEF) is a valid measure of health status in older adults. Survey and test data from the 2006 and 2008 cycles of the Health and Retirement Study, a longitudinal study of US adults over age 50 years (with biennial surveys initiated in 1992), were used to develop predicted PEF regression models and to examine relations between low PEF values and other clinical factors. Low PEF (<80% of predicted value) was prevalent among persons with chronic conditions, including frequent pain, obstructive lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, and psychological distress. Persons with higher physical disability scores had substantially higher adjusted odds of having low PEF, on par with those for conditions known to be associated with poor health (cancer, heart disease, and stroke). In a multivariate regression model for difficulty with mobility, PEF remained an independent factor (odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 1.86). Persons with low PEF in 2006 were more likely to be hospitalized (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.43) within the subsequent 2 years and to estimate their chances of surviving for 10 or more years at less than 50% (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.24, 2.30). PEF is a valid measure of health status in older persons, and low PEF is an independent predictor of hospitalization and poor subjective mortality assessment.</p>

Notes

Roberts, Melissa H Mapel, Douglas W United States Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Jul 15;176(2):127-34. Epub 2012 Jun 28.

DOI10.1093/aje/kwr503
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22759722?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

peak expiratory flow/disability/disability/hospitalization/physical fitness

Endnote ID

69580

Alternate JournalAm. J. Epidemiol.
Citation Key7739
PubMed ID22759722
PubMed Central IDPMC3493194
Grant ListU01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States