Physical health effects of the housing boom: quasi-experimental evidence from the health and retirement study

TitlePhysical health effects of the housing boom: quasi-experimental evidence from the health and retirement study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHamoudi, A, Dowd, JBeam
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume103
Issue6
Pagination1039-1045
KeywordsHealth Conditions and Status, Healthcare, Housing
Abstract

Objectives. We examined the impact of the dramatic increases in housing prices in the United States in the 1990s and early 2000s on physical health outcomes among a representative sample of middle-aged and older Americans. Methods. Using a quasi-experimental design, we exploited geographic and time variation in housing prices using third-party valuation estimates of median single-family detached houses from 1988 to 2007 in each of 2400 zip codes combined with Health and Retirement Study data from 1992 to 2006 to test the impact of housing appreciation on physical health outcomes. Results. Respondents living in communities in which home values appreciated more rapidly had fewer functional limitations, performed better on interviewer-administered physical tasks, and had smaller waist circumference. Conclusions. Our results indicate that increases in housing wealth were associated with better health outcomes for homeowners in late middle age and older. The recent sharp decline in housing values for this group may likewise be expected to have important implications for health and should be examined as data become available.

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2012.301205
Endnote Keywords

health outcomes/housing markets/functional limitation

Endnote ID

69036

Citation Key7824