Question context and priming meaning of health: effect on differences in self-rated health between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites.

TitleQuestion context and priming meaning of health: effect on differences in self-rated health between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsLee, S, Schwarz, N
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume104
Issue1
Pagination179-85
Date Published2014 Jan
ISSN Number1541-0048
KeywordsAged, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Status, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Self Report, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the implications of the current recommended data collection practice of placing self-rated health (SRH) before specific health-related questions (hence, without a health context) to remove potential context effects, between Hispanics and non-Hispanics.

METHODS: We used 2 methodologically comparable surveys conducted in English and Spanish that asked SRH in different contexts: before and after specific health questions. Focusing on the elderly, we compared the influence of question contexts on SRH between Hispanics and non-Hispanics and between Spanish and English speakers.

RESULTS: The question context influenced SRH reports of Spanish speakers (and Hispanics) significantly but not of English speakers (and non-Hispanics). Specifically, on SRH within a health context, Hispanics reported more positive health, decreasing the gap with non-Hispanic Whites by two thirds, and the measurement utility of SRH was improved through more consistent mortality prediction across ethnic and linguistic groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to the current recommendation, asking SRH within a health context enhanced measurement utility. Studies using SRH may result in erroneous conclusions when one does not consider its question context.

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2012.301055
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23678900?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Medical Sciences/Medical research/Language/Studies/Polls/surveys/Hispanic Americans/Interviews/Whites/Personal health/United States--US

Endnote ID

999999

Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
Citation Key8079
PubMed ID23678900
PubMed Central IDPMC3910022
Grant ListU01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States