Racial/Ethnic Predictors of Falls Among Older Adults: The Health and Retirement Study

TitleRacial/Ethnic Predictors of Falls Among Older Adults: The Health and Retirement Study
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsNicklett, EJ, Taylor, RJoseph
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume26
Issue6
Pagination1060-1075
KeywordsDemographics, Health Conditions and Status, Risk Taking, Women and Minorities
Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine racial/ethnic differences in the probability and frequency of falls among adults aged 65 and older. Method: Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) from 2000 to 2010, the authors conducted random-intercept logistic and Poisson regression analyses to examine whether race/ethnicity predicted the likelihood of a fall event and the frequency of falls. Results: The analytic sample included 10,484 older adults. Baseline analyses showed no significant racial/ethnic differences in the probability or number of falls. However, in the longitudinal random-intercept models, African Americans had significantly lower odds (0.65) of experiencing at least one fall compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Among fallers, African Americans had significantly fewer falls (24 ) than non-Hispanic Whites, controlling for health and sociodemographic covariates (all ps .05). Latinos did not differ from non-Hispanic Whites in the likelihood or number of falls. Discussion: African Americans are less likely to experience initial or recurrent falls than non-Hispanic Whites.

Notes

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DOI10.1177/0898264314541698
Endnote Keywords

falls/fall rates/fall risk/ethnicity/older adults/risk factors/ethnic differences/African Americans/hispanics

Endnote ID

999999

Citation Key8094
PubMed ID25005171
PubMed Central IDPMC4227632