Depression and risk of hospitalization for pneumonia in a cohort study of older Americans.

TitleDepression and risk of hospitalization for pneumonia in a cohort study of older Americans.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsDavydow, DS, Hough, CL, Zivin, K, Langa, KM, Katon, WJ
JournalJ Psychosom Res
Volume77
Issue6
Pagination528-34
Date Published2014 Dec
ISSN Number1879-1360
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, depression, Depressive Disorder, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Pneumonia, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to determine if depression is independently associated with risk of hospitalization for pneumonia after adjusting for demographics, medical comorbidity, health-risk behaviors, baseline cognition and functional impairments.

METHODS: This secondary analysis of prospectively collected data examined a population-based sample of 6704 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (1998-2008) participants>50years old who consented to have their interviews linked to their Medicare claims and were without a dementia diagnosis. The eight-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and/or International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) depression diagnoses were used to identify baseline depression. ICD-9-CM diagnoses were used to identify hospitalizations for which the principal discharge diagnosis was for bacterial or viral pneumonia. The odds of hospitalization for pneumonia for participants with depression relative to those without depression were estimated using logistic regression models. Population attributable fractions were calculated to determine the extent that hospitalizations for pneumonia could be attributable to depression.

RESULTS: After adjusting for demographic characteristics, clinical factors, and health-risk behaviors, depression was independently associated with increased odds of hospitalization for pneumonia (odds ratio [OR]: 1.28, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.08, 1.53). This association persisted after adjusting for baseline cognition and functional impairments (OR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.03, 1.50). In this cohort, 6% (95%CI: 2%, 10%) of hospitalizations for pneumonia were potentially attributable to depression.

CONCLUSION: Depression is independently associated with increased odds of hospitalization for pneumonia. This study provides additional rationale for integrating mental health care into medical settings in order to improve outcomes for older adults.

Notes

Times Cited: 0 0

DOI10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.08.002
User Guide Notes

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25139125?dopt=Abstract

Endnote Keywords

Depression/Pneumonia/Hospitalization/Outcome assessment (health care)/health Care Utilization/mental Health

Endnote ID

999999

Alternate JournalJ Psychosom Res
Citation Key8142
PubMed ID25139125
PubMed Central IDPMC4259844
Grant ListU01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG030155 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG09740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000421 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
K08 HL091249 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States