Comparison of hypertension healthcare outcomes among older people in the USA and England.

TitleComparison of hypertension healthcare outcomes among older people in the USA and England.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMarshall, A, Nazroo, J, Feeney, K, Lee, J, Vanhoutte, B, Pendleton, N
JournalJournal of epidemiology and community health
Volume70
Issue3
Pagination264-270
Date Published2016 Mar
ISSN Number1470-2738
KeywordsEngland, Healthcare, Hypertension
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The USA and England have very different health systems. Comparing hypertension care outcomes in each country enables an evaluation of the effectiveness of each system.

METHOD: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing and the Health and Retirement Survey are used to compare the prevalence of controlled, uncontrolled and undiagnosed hypertension within the hypertensive population (diagnosed or measured within the survey data used) aged 50 years and above in the USA and in England.

RESULTS: Controlled hypertension is more prevalent within the hypertensive population in the USA (age 50-64: 0.53 (0.50 to 0.57) and age 65+: 0.51 (0.49 to 0.53)) than in England (age 50-64: 0.45 (0.42 to 0.48) and age 65+: 0.42 (0.40 to 0.45)). This difference is driven by lower undiagnosed hypertension in the USA (age 50-64: 0.18 (0.15-0.21) and age 65+: 0.13 (0.12 to 0.14)) relative to England (age 50-64: 0.26 (0.24 to 0.29) and age 65+: 0.22 (0.20 to 0.24)). The prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension within the hypertensive population is very similar in the USA (age 50-64: 0.29 (0.26 to 0.32) and age 65+: 0.36 (0.34 to 0.38)) and England (age 50-64: 0.29 (0.26 to 0.32) and age 65+: 0.36 (0.34 to 0.39)). Hypertension care outcomes are comparable across US insurance categories. In both countries, undiagnosed hypertension is positively correlated with wealth (ages 50-64). Uncontrolled hypertension declines with rising wealth in the USA.

CONCLUSIONS: Different diagnostic practices are likely to drive the cross-country differences in undiagnosed hypertension. US government health systems perform at least as well as private healthcare and are more equitable in the distribution of care outcomes. Higher undiagnosed hypertension among the affluent may reflect less frequent medical contact.

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26598759
DOI10.1136/jech-2014-205336
Endnote Keywords

ELSA
HRS
Hypertension
Healthcare
Universal healthcare

Alternate JournalJ Epidemiol Community Health
Citation Key8479
PubMed ID26598759
PubMed Central IDPMC4789814
Grant List2R01 AG030153 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
G1001375 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G1001375/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R01 AG017644 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States