Personality Polygenes, Positive Affect, and Life Satisfaction.

TitlePersonality Polygenes, Positive Affect, and Life Satisfaction.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsWeiss, A, Baselmans, BML, Hofer, E, Yang, J, Okbay, A, Lind, PA, Miller, MB, Nolte, IM, Zhao, W, Hagenaars, SP, Hottenga, J-J, Matteson, L, Snieder, H, Faul, JD, Hartman, CA, Boyle, PA, Tiemeier, H, Mosing, MA, Pattie, A, Davies, G, Liewald, DC, Schmidt, R, De Jager, PL, Heath, AC, Jokela, M, Starr, JM, Oldehinkel, AJ, Johannesson, M, Cesarini, D, Hofman, A, Harris, SE, Smith, JA, Keltikangas-Järvinen, L, Pulkki-Raback, L, Schmidt, H, Smith, J, Iacono, WG, McGue, M, Bennett, DA, Pedersen, NL, Magnusson, PKE, Deary, IJ, Martin, NG, Boomsma, DI, Bartels, M, Luciano, M
JournalTwin Res Hum Genet
Volume19
Issue5
Pagination407-17
Date Published2016 Oct
ISSN Number1832-4274
KeywordsGenetics, Happiness, Polygenic Prediction, SSGAC, Well-being
Abstract

Approximately half of the variation in wellbeing measures overlaps with variation in personality traits. Studies of non-human primate pedigrees and human twins suggest that this is due to common genetic influences. We tested whether personality polygenic scores for the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) domains and for item response theory (IRT) derived extraversion and neuroticism scores predict variance in wellbeing measures. Polygenic scores were based on published genome-wide association (GWA) results in over 17,000 individuals for the NEO-FFI and in over 63,000 for the IRT extraversion and neuroticism traits. The NEO-FFI polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction in 7 cohorts, positive affect in 12 cohorts, and general wellbeing in 1 cohort (maximal N = 46,508). Meta-analysis of these results showed no significant association between NEO-FFI personality polygenic scores and the wellbeing measures. IRT extraversion and neuroticism polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction and positive affect in almost 37,000 individuals from UK Biobank. Significant positive associations (effect sizes <0.05%) were observed between the extraversion polygenic score and wellbeing measures, and a negative association was observed between the polygenic neuroticism score and life satisfaction. Furthermore, using GWA data, genetic correlations of -0.49 and -0.55 were estimated between neuroticism with life satisfaction and positive affect, respectively. The moderate genetic correlation between neuroticism and wellbeing is in line with twin research showing that genetic influences on wellbeing are also shared with other independent personality domains.

DOI10.1017/thg.2016.65
Alternate JournalTwin Res Hum Genet
Citation Key8876
PubMed ID27546527
PubMed Central IDPMC5125297
Grant ListRC2 MH089951 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC4 AG039029 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA007535 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA014041 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH081802 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH066206 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA009367 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
U01 AG009740 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RC2 MH089995 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA011886 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA013326 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG017917 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 DA024417 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA013321 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH066140 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC2 AG036495 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R37 DA005147 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG015819 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AA013320 / AA / NIAAA NIH HHS / United States
R01 DA013240 / DA / NIDA NIH HHS / United States